Case Number 110060 - A Novel Genetic Marker for Food Allergy

Contact: Jill Uhl
Email: uhlje@ucmail.uc.edu
Phone: 513-558-5621

Description:  University of Cincinnati researchers with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Researchers have identified a novel genetic marker for food allergy. The V75 IL-4Ra / Q130 IL-13 / T-159CÆT CD14 allele combination is strongly associated with food allergy and is an important genetic marker to identify at-risk infants. In addition, the genetic markers may be useful in predicting the natural history of food allergy and aiding the management of this common condition. The researchers have determined that with each locus analyzed at the level of genotypes, the TT (CD14 -159 CÆT) genotype was significantly associated with food allergy. However, no significant allele frequency difference between food allergy patients and normal controls was observed at any of the six polymorphic sites when analyzed individually. Sequential multi-locus analyses revealed significant excess of 2-locus VV (I75V IL-4Ra) – QR (R130Q IL-13), and QR (R130Q IL-13) – TT (159 CÆT CD14) in food allergy patients compared to controls (p = 0.029 and 0.011, respectively). This was caused by a dramatic increase of individuals carrying the allele combination of V75 IL-4Ra / Q130 IL-13 / T- 159CÆT CD14 in patients with food allergy, compared to controls (p = 0.008). Furthermore, this allele combination was associated with the phenotype of eczema among food allergy patients (p=0.02). Peanuts (n = 63), milk (n = 41), and egg (n = 39) were the major foods causing food allergy in this study. Peanuts, milk, and egg each had specific genetic fingerprints, and therefore this technology may be applicable in diagnosing food allergies in the future.

A US patent has been issued as Serial # 7,732,135, entitled Genetic markers of food allergy.

For more information, please see this summary